Wangelspitze: the first visit

Mayrhofen

View from Penken.

It’s bucketing it down outside and inside, the mood is dreary. It’s also absolutely freezing. Has the weather forgotten it’s May? To cheer myself up, I thought I’d reminisce with you about a walk up to the point of Wangelspitze in Mayrhofen. Thinking about happy times on holiday will surely chase the grey day away…

I made my first walk up Wangelspitze during my first trip to Mayrhofen. We soared up the stomach-dropping Penkenbahn lift and stepped out into the broad sunshine, ready and raring to go. We didn’t have a specific aim for the day, so we thought that we would just pick a random trail and see where it led.

We started by following the path up Penken. We could have cheated and got the small cable car up, but we are hard-core hikers (stop sniggering at the back!), so we simply powered up the hill. (You can see the route up from this webcam.)

We then wandered past the Christialm, which has a cool sign showing you the distances to iconic locations such as London and New York. The path then wound downhill a little way, before climbing steadily upwards.

Mayrhofen

Sign showing the distance to different places and landmarks.

This part of the route is very easy going and the path is in good condition, so if you wanted an easy walk, this would be a good location.

We continued to follow the path on its upward slant, before we came to a sign that jutted off in various directions. We dithered a while about where to go, but we eventually opted for the sign labelled ‘Wangelspitze’. It seemed easy enough and was marked as a red route, meaning intermediate.

Mayrhofen

Sign to Wangelspitze.

Following this new route, we came to a gorgeous, old shepherd’s hut. It offered a fantastic view over the mountains, so we stopped here for lunch. Once refreshed, we followed a trickier route that climbed steadily upwards. Things were getting a little tougher.

We could now see the summit of Wangelspitze, but it looked a long, long way away. At this time, I was not a very experienced walker, and the narrow path and steep ascent freaked me out a bit. The path is very winding, and it gets narrower the further you go up. I have to admit that I needed a few breaks.

Mayrhofen

Wangelspitze up ahead.

Even if you don’t need a breather, it is worth stopping for a few minutes as you climb to get a glimpse of the ever improving view. Going rapidly upwards means that you quickly get rewarded with a fabulous view. You can see little ant people scurrying along the path you have just walked, and you can also look down in to the valleys surrounding the mountain.

Mayrhofen.

View as we went up Wangelspitze.

Finally, with burning legs and lungs, we reached the summit. It was quite a view.

Mayrhofen

The summit.

Once we’d filled our eyes with the sights of mountains, valleys and verdant meadows, we picked our way back down. I had a few hairy moments because I feel more unbalanced going downhill, and we had to make way for walkers working their way up the narrow path, but we made it in one piece.

Once we got all the way back to Christialm, we rewarded ourselves with a few drinks. I regressed back into childhood and ordered two very different beverages because I couldn’t decide which one I wanted most. I was on holiday, so it didn’t matter. (The drink in the wine glass is a cocktail called Hugo, it is deliciously summery and I highly recommend it. It’s made of Prosecco, soda water, elderflower cordial and mint leaves. Yum.)

Mayrhofen

Hot chocolate and a Hugo.

As we caught the cable cars back down Penken, the clouds started to settle in. But it didn’t matter as we had had our fill for the day and we were ready to tuck into a hearty feast. Oh, to be there right now!

What (or where) do you like to think about on a gloomy day? Share below!

 

 

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